Melannen

Okay, first request: Sound of Silence! You get full piano/vocal/guitar, and also guitar chords+lyrics, and fake (melody + lyrics + cords). Because I guess they needed to bulk out their pages.

…this was my first ever attempt to scan to a multipage pdf.

I have my scanner out tonight.

I have also put all of the sheet music I own* into a spreadsheet, so here is your limited-time offer: until I go to sleep tonight, anybody who wants can request one song off that list and I will scan it for them. Enjoy!

Sheet Music Index

I suggest using full-text search if you want to find a certain song, there’s almost 4000 entries in the list. It’s heavily skewed toward old standards/broadway/pop/folk music from 1979 and before, because that’s what you get when you shop at yard sales for it. Highlights include: a bunch of “buy war bonds!” sheet music from the early ’40s, the complete Tom Lehrer collection, Donald Swann’s settings of the songs of Tolkien.

…No I am not good enough to play most of this by a long shot. I play the melody line with one hand. I am a ridiculous person.

* that’s not actually all of it, I haven’t put in some of the fake books or the any of the hymnal collection yet. or any of the stuff printed off the internet. or most of the stuff in the lesson books, or most of the clarinet/sax/flute/organ music. but it’s most of it.

jkthinkythoughts:

melannen:

lotesseflower:

jkthinkythoughts:

Everyone wants to be the one that walked away from Omelas. No one actually is. What you buy or how you dress or even how you vote will not wash the blood off your hands.

one of the big cruel real things about that story, also, is that the ones who walk away from Omelas do not save the child, or prevent its torture. Even the ones who walk away remain complicit in the continuation of its abuse.

Le Guin’s Daoist anarchism can be cold and stony like that.

The thing that really kills me about that story is that by some theories of economics, one way to ensure relative prosperity and an even distribution of wealth is to create a labor shortage.

Omelas is prosperous not because of the child, but because the Ones Who Walk Away create a perpetually low unemployment rate compared to other cities on the plain.

That’s realllly not the point that I was making. Also, the story makes it (I think) explicit that only a *low* percentage of citizens make the choice to leave. Finally, that’s a pretty facile reading of that particular economic theory.

Oh yeah, it totally is. But most economic theories are pretty facile readings of the real world, anyway. And it is an SF story about a magic city. Given the premise it wouldn’t have to be that high a percentage, though - the difference between a recession-level unemployment rate and an expansion-level unemployment rate is only a couple of percentage points, especially if it’s disproportionately single young adults that you’re losing.

(I’m not sure the conclusion of my point is that different from what you’re saying - walking away (or buying organic/fair trade/local/whatever) won’t solve the problem, especially since a lot of the “ethical” branding is designed to just prop up the system even farther.)

lotesseflower:

jkthinkythoughts:

Everyone wants to be the one that walked away from Omelas. No one actually is. What you buy or how you dress or even how you vote will not wash the blood off your hands.

one of the big cruel real things about that story, also, is that the ones who walk away from Omelas do not save the child, or prevent its torture. Even the ones who walk away remain complicit in the continuation of its abuse.

Le Guin’s Daoist anarchism can be cold and stony like that.

The thing that really kills me about that story is that by some theories of economics, one way to ensure relative prosperity and an even distribution of wealth is to create a labor shortage.

Omelas is prosperous not because of the child, but because the Ones Who Walk Away create an articifically low unemployment rate compared to other cities on the plain. The leaders of the city have figured out how to dispose of the sort of excess population that creates civil unrest and flood their competitors with refugees, all without anything as messy as a war.

The life and times of Sergeant James ‘Bucky’ Barnes

melannen:

laporcupina:

Okay, so a little self-referential blahblahblah on Bucky’s NCO career, mostly as a follow-up to the Sam Wilson Is Not an Officer stuff.

(1) At the start of Captain America: the First Avenger, Bucky has been a soldier for a while and a very good one. Whether Bucky enlisted or was drafted, he went to basic training and he emerged some flavor of private or, in truly exceptional circumstances, a corporal. Nobody comes out of basic a sergeant, which is an NCO (non-commissioned officer) rank and one of responsibility. When we meet Bucky in the movie, he’s been a soldier for a while, long enough for at least one promotion up to E-5, two or three promotions being much more likely. Which is a lot in a short amount of time – about a year-and-a-half past Pearl Harbor, less time in service assuming Bucky didn’t ship off to basic in 1941. As such, I’ve usually written Bucky as getting a field promotion for valor in combat because things just don’t happen that quickly. It’s still a speedy trip to sergeant, but it’s not completely ridiculous.

Any way you want to play it, when Steve is asking Bucky if he’s gotten his orders, he’s not asking brand-new-soldier Bucky about his first chance to be a ‘real’ soldier. He’s asking probably-home-on-leave Sergeant Barnes where he’s going next.

(2) Bucky has experience leading small units – a team, a squad. He might have already been a platoon sergeant, but no sure thing. Regardless, by the time he’s rescued by Steve, he’s an experienced NCO. He knows how to get things done, both with respect to regular Army crap and the corralling and maintenance of the men in his unit. He understands how the division of labor between CO and NCOIC works out, that he is the sheepdog to the CO’s shepherd when it comes to executing orders and handling the men. He also understands that the relationship between platoon sergeant and platoon commander is a separate thing between them and has a public face, which is united and in which the NCO is proper and respectful of rank, and a private face, which is more informal and generally reflects the fact that the NCO has more life and military experience than the officer and has an obligation to use those experiences to improve the officer and keep everyone from getting killed.

(3) Both points above matter when it comes to Sergeant Barnes and Captain Rogers, especially because the latter was commissioned as a captain and has never had a command position before at any level and truly and completely knows nothing about nothing about leading anyone anywhere to do anything in some form of proper military fashion. Bucky’s instruction necessarily doesn’t begin once he’s team sergeant on the Howling Commandos – it begins during the rescue, the minute he realizes that he’s not having a drug-induced hallucination and Steve really is Captain America and needs all the help that he can get because Steve doesn’t know what the hell he’s doing. Even if Steve doesn’t confess that right away, which he probably will, Bucky knows him well enough to tell.

(4) As important as Sergeant Barnes’s experience is to Captain Rogers, it’s possibly even more important to Brooklyn’s Own Bucky Barnes. Who has been through hell on the battlefield, an even worse hell in Zola’s and Schmidt’s lab, and is now presented with a very hard truth: Steve Rogers doesn’t need him anymore. Steve is no longer frail by many metric; he doesn’t need defending or nurturing, he doesn’t need anyone to advertise his virtues or prop up his self-esteem because everyone else now knows exactly how awesome Captain America is. Steve is no longer short of friends or invisible to women or at the mercy of either his ailments or the neighborhood bullies. Every single protective function Bucky has ever filled for Steve out of friendship and brotherhood has now been rendered moot. Thankfully, while Steve may not need him for anything but companionship anymore, Captain Rogers needs him for a hell of a lot. Steve may be quicker in mind and body, but Bucky is the one who knows how to make everything happen. And that won’t change even as Steve learns the ropes; Captain Rogers will always need Sergeant Barnes. And that’s probably a comfort to Bucky at a time when little else is.

 And now the self-referential part, because I’m like that:

 Antediluvian and La Caduta: the former is Bucky’s pre-movie war career and the latter is his imprisonment, where he struggles to be an NCOIC while also being a lab rat, through the rescue and the formation of the Howling Commandos.

 Recursive, which is a Steve(-and-Bucky) story, but mostly about the Howling Commandos and Steve’s CO-NCOIC relationships with both Bucky and Dum Dum Dugan (after Bucky’s fall) matter a lot.

While I really like this version of Bucky’s history, I want to point out that the general premise - that Bucky would not have become a Sergeant without a fair amount of field experience and likely a battlefield promotion, and that he would have been promoted unusually quickly - is not necessarily correct. The US’s entry into WWII resulted in such a massive and rapid expansion of the US military that it was simply not physically possible to promote NCOs based on experience - they needed new NCOs too desperately for that. New recruits and draftees were given an aptitude/general intelligence test, the AGCT, and the top percentiles of the scorers were designated as NCO candidates (actually, at the start of the war, the top scorers were sent to the Army Air Force or to college for officer training, so the above-average-to-middling-ish were left to become the NCOs for the new divisions; being a high school graduate would likely be enough to make you a candidate in some cases.) Very often NCO candidates would be promoted to Corporal right out of Basic, get minimal extra training, and make Sergeant very quickly thereafter; some people selected for extra specialty training would be promoted to Sergeant by the end of the extra training. And in 1942, when the number of enlisted men was increasing by hundreds of thousands a month and the need for NCOs was desperate, it wasn’t unusual for a particularly promising recruit to be promoted directly from Private to Sergeant while still in boot camp.

So it’s possible Bucky has some combat experience and a field promotion, but as long as you believe he could have gotten, oh, somewhere around 100 on a primitive IQ test (and that he had enough pride that he would’ve turned down the chance to go to college instead) it’s also perfectly likely that Sergeant Barnes really was just out of training and about to go overseas for the first time at the beginning of the first movie, and was in over his head almost as much as Steve in terms of actual knowledge and experience - but figured it out as fast as he needed to in order to keep being Steve’s backup.

This has shown up on my dash twice tonight in its original, so I’m re-reblogging my reblog of it, just because. Tumblr. (Other people have reblogged with similar notes according to xkit. But. Tumblr. No faster way to spread authoritative-sounding misinformation….)

Okay……

wrangletangle:

jmars999:

image

image

Someone needs to explain common to AO3

Hi! “Common” means “canonical”. It simply means that the tag appears in the filters and auto-complete. It doesn’t mean anything about the quantity of uses. There are (only a few, but they do exist) 0-use common tags.

That said, I have a lot of ships where 53 works would be amazing. (Actually, I have a lot of fandoms where I’d be crying tears of joy to have that many works.) So “common” in terms of quantity might be in the eye of the beholder?

I always assumed “Common” in “common tag” meant “officially shared”. Like “creative commons” or “common ground”, or “common property” in a marriage. A common tag is a tag that’s no longer a tag that belongs to a particular user on a particular work - it’s now a tag that the entire archive is invited to share in common.

Librarian AU
Cinaed: haha, jam asked for a merfolk/library Les Mis au
Cinaed: maybe I should do one where Madeleine refuses to become mayor and becomes the town librarian instead (while running the factory), and Javert has to enlist his help because his squirrels are acting strangely and he’s gathered such a large collection of books
Melannen: I would totally read a fic where valjean accidentally becomes a librarian
Melannen: …crap now I want to write a fic where valjean accidentally becomes a librarian
Cinaed: *laughs*
Cinaed: canon era or just library au?
Melannen: like, it starts with Montparnasse coming to him, and he tricks Montparnasse into learning to read
Melannen: and then Montparnasse is showing off, and Eponine is like “where did you learn that?”
Melannen: and a day later she’s at his door with a hungry look in her eyes saying “I heard you have…. books”
Cinaed: oooh
Melannen: and he can’t turn her away
Cinaed: and she gets Azelma to come too
Cinaed: and between the two of them they trick gavroche into learning his letters
Melannen: he loans them some to try to teach Gavroche
Melannen: yes
Melannen: pretty soon he’s public library / literacy tutor for half the underclass of that part of Paris

Read More

Headcanon

A modern AU where the mayor’s office declares that all the police precincts have to have official tumblrs in order to be Hip with the Kids. Nobody at Javert’s precinct wants to be bothered so they make Javert do it because he’s too bad at office politics to get out of it.

He basically just reblogs official statements from the city government once a month, and sometimes McGruff the Crime Dog when he’s feeling particularly assiduous.

Then the barricades happen and in all the chaos it takes several days before anybody notices that the station’s official tumblr is now posting something everyday at 1 AM exactly, in the form

Dear M. Gisquet:
[link to news article about police brutality or injustice in the justice system]
[frowny emoticon or gif of someone contemplating suicide].
Sincerely, Inspector Javert.

Javert spent the night after the barricades queuing up years’ worth of those.

He was the only one with the passwords to the account. They can’t turn it off.

sambeferre:

I saw this picture and I have no idea what the fuck just happened …


PROTIP 2: While I also enjoy the various fanworks, please don’t tag your Enjolras Superhero AU fic on AO3 with “Captain France”. There are several Captain Frances in comics canon, of whom the least embarassing is probably this dude, Hugo Etherlinck from Earth-1610:
I have to just send the tags to Marvel fandom, and then the Marvel wranglers cry. 1
If you’re going to insist on giving him a superhero identity that’s actually appeared in Marvel canon, call him Adamantine, commander of Les Heroes de Paris, which is his actual canonical name when he appears as a Marvel superhero:
(I especially appreciate that his costume there seems to be intended to reference Apollo’s superhero outfit.  …or possibly Power Girl’s.)
1Not actually true, no Marvel wrangler is capable of crying human tears once they’ve survived the initiation rites/transformation sequence.

sambeferre:

I saw this picture and I have no idea what the fuck just happened …

PROTIP 2: While I also enjoy the various fanworks, please don’t tag your Enjolras Superhero AU fic on AO3 with “Captain France”. There are several Captain Frances in comics canon, of whom the least embarassing is probably this dude, Hugo Etherlinck from Earth-1610:

I have to just send the tags to Marvel fandom, and then the Marvel wranglers cry. 1

If you’re going to insist on giving him a superhero identity that’s actually appeared in Marvel canon, call him Adamantine, commander of Les Heroes de Paris, which is his actual canonical name when he appears as a Marvel superhero:

(I especially appreciate that his costume there seems to be intended to reference Apollo’s superhero outfit. …or possibly Power Girl’s.)

1Not actually true, no Marvel wrangler is capable of crying human tears once they’ve survived the initiation rites/transformation sequence.

tenlittlebullets replied to your post: AO3 tagging advice

but what about Aliens Make Them Do It

Aliens Make Them Do It is PROBLEM.

Because yes, that phrase has a long history as a label for fic and of course we will always have a tag for it because it’s a tag that a lot of people will be filtering by, and also as a blatant generalization about the tag wranglers we love stuff like that, so if you tag your fic Aliens Made Them Do It, people searching for Aliens Made Them Do It fic will find be able to your stuff.

But. It’s not actually a great tag in terms of filtering.

If you look at the tag landing page for Something Made Them Do It, you will note that tag’s not linked to much of anything that isn’t in the specific form [Something] Made (or Makes) Them Do [Something]. We can’t, for example, link that tag to sex, because sometimes the aliens make them learn to knit, or square-dance. So someone looking for fics about sex won’t find your fic from that tag. And we can’t link it to the consent-issues tags, because every once in a long while, Aliens Make Them Learn About Free Consent (and also, we try not to judge whether a given tag for a story kink is noncon, dubcon, or other, unless the writer specifies), so people looking for dubcon won’t find your fic from that tag. Such discussions we have had about trying to make that tag more interlinked, but there’s really not much we can do, with the built-in ambiguity.

So go ahead and tag with Aliens Made Them Do It, but you might want to add other useful tags that specify what exactly the aliens made them do.